• The biggest cave in Iceland, Víðgelmir.
    For all those cave curious travellers, Iceland having quite a collection of diverse caves, might be the perfect place to go. Here is a photograph of the entrance to the biggest one of those caves, Víðgelmir. Situated in the Hallmundarhraun lava field (West Iceland), Víðgelmir is a 1585 meter long lava tube. An expedition to the cave is interesting both for historical input as well as geographical. Traces of human habitation, most likely from the Viking Age have been found in Víðgelmir. Another...
  • In many corners in every part of Iceland, there is a place connected to folklore.
    In many corners in every part of Iceland, there is a place connected to folklore.  Even in places that are very popular tourist attractions. Stories of trolls, elves, ghosts, mysterious creatures, demons, and zombies.  Stories of communication between humans and all kinds of beings, creatures and entities from another dimension or another world. Creatures from the inland and monster related entities that live in the ocean or peaceful lakes and beings that live in cliffs, a small hill or a rock...
  • Iceland has approximately 70 towns and villages around the island. This is our top 10 list.
    Iceland has approximately 70 towns and villages around the island. Some are tiny hamlets or just a cluster of houses and barely fit into the definition of a village. Most of the towns do not have a long history, as Iceland was an agricultural society for centuries. The first indication of towns traces their beginning to a trading post or a fishing post. Of the 70 towns and villages, only a few can trace their history farther back than the 18th century. Although small, most of them were at some...
  • Vestmannaeyjar is a cluster of islands south of Iceland.
    An island off an island. Vestmannaeyjar is a cluster of islands south of Iceland. The largest one of them, Heimaey is a residential area, a small town with a population of 4,135 people.   In 1973 the Eldfell Volcano erupted in Vestmannaeyjar forcing the whole population to evacuate to mainland Iceland for at least a month. Afterwards came a period of building up the town again, since about fifth of the town was destroyed by the lava flow. The island is known for its versatile birdlife. For...
  • The popularity of the puffin as an item to view has increased considerably in recent years
    The popularity of the puffin as an item to view has increased considerably in recent years.  Before tourism exploded in Iceland very few people paid much attention to the puffin apart from those who hunted the bird. Particular attention was on the other hand given to the puffin in the Westman Islands south of Iceland, where it was a “national sport” to hunt puffins at a particular time of the year.  The puffin hunting in The Westman Islands is an ancient tradition. Although the small bird is...
  • Muddy layers next to the turquoise coloured water form an organic pattern.
    Yet again we want to encourage visitors to pay extra attention to the various details, hidden in the overwhelming landscape of Iceland. This photo is taken, on a hike we went on in Nýidalur (New Valley) in the heart of the Icelandic highland. Muddy layers next to the turquoise coloured water form an organic pattern that could almost be mistaken for car tier traces, although this bay-mud is much more beautiful. These soil layers of soft, unconsolidated clay, saturated with water are normally in...
  • The river Kaldaklofskvísl (Cold crotch distributary) and Klámbrekka is between the hill in the background and the mountain Stóra Grænafjall.
    Throughout the centuries Icelanders have been very efficient and almost pedantic in giving names to every small piece of item in the landscape throughout the whole country.  Wherever you go, everything from a high and mighty mountain to a low hill seems to have a name.  Every creek and every river have a name.  Every waterfall in our extensive variety of small and large falls has a name.  And believe me, we have hundreds of waterfalls.  Every cliff, lava field, every lake, every cave, every hot...
  • Here we have the second highest waterfall in Iceland
    Here we have the second highest waterfall in Iceland, which is how it deserves its name, Háifoss or The High Waterfall. Since it is so high, it feels relevant to show it in parts, although you can also see beautiful photographs of the whole waterfall here. This photo shows the very start of it, zoomed in, to also be able to enjoy the detailed layers of different rock and mud around it, including tiny basalt rock formations. Háifoss is situated close to the volcano Hekla, as well as the famous...
  • As if the waterfall wasn’t enough, the mountains around it with its layers of rocks and moss make this a perfect pitstop.
    Around the country in many of the recommended pitstops the facilities are always getting better. Whether it is a walking path to experience safely a family of geysers, a support rail to step in to the slippery hot spring or a sightseeing platform like this one. As we have mentioned before there are many ways of viewing Ófærufoss, and this particular platform lets one see the waterfall as a whole from above. It is great when these interventions are subtle and don’t disturb the surrounding view....
  • A strict line was drawn between the black sand and the vegetation
    In many places deep in the Highland in Iceland, you can find unusual and almost strange sights. Sometimes dark sites, boiling sites, vast view, strange lava formation and much more.  One such place is near Lakagígar where we have vast carpets of lava, a lot of ash, dust, and black sands.  This is also at an altitude where vegetation has difficulties to grow and sustain.  Sometimes while traveling in the Highland you can experience the dark sand continuing all around you form kilometers after...

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