Eastern Region

  • On some of the routes in Iceland, there aren't  many natural wonders like waterfalls, hot springs or lagoons, but mountains and valleys which make these routes quite scenic. They are first and foremost pleasant drives, and any stop you make is to view spectacular surroundings rather than a particular place. The fjord Álftafjörður in the East Region in Iceland is one such place. It opens up on the Ring Road, Road Nr. 1 in Iceland, soon after you pass the spectacular Eystrahorn, it is a joy to...
  • Beljandi is a waterfall in the river Breiðdalsá located in the valley Breiðdalur near the farm Brekkuborg. The waterfall is in the eastern part of Iceland.  A characteristic for the waterfall contrary to many famous Icelandic waterfalls is how low it is and wide, only about two to three meters in height but quite wide with the stream running over and between rocks.  Another characteristic is the amount of water and the fact that the waterfall is placed on a lowland in the middle of the valley,...
  • When driving south on the Ring Road in Berufjörður in the Eastern Region in Iceland, after passing the farm Þiljuvellir, and just before you come to the farm Fagrihvammur, you can't help noticing a small blue cliff by the shore. The name of the place is Blábjörg or Blue Cliff.  If you are coming from the south, it is not hard to miss as the cliffs are barely in view, but keep in mind that they are located a few hundred meters after you pass the farm Fagrihvammur.  The cliffs are amazing and a...
  • Icelanders have always been keen mountain climbers; they have even written poems about climbing mountains, falling, scraping and cutting themselves – but always getting to the top. Still, there is at least one mountain in Iceland you simply can't climb: Eystrahorn in the southeast part of East Iceland. It is a mere 756 m, but made up of gabbro and granophyre and extremely steep, Landslides are almost a constant, so much so, that even the great Sysiphus wouldn't even be able to get started....
  • Flögufoss is an impressive waterfall in the valley Breiðdalur in eastern Iceland.  It is a fairly high waterfall, around 60 meters, and located in beautiful surroundings with geology speaking out loud from every angle. In the midst of the geologically fascinating valley Breiðdalur.  Near the top of the waterfall, there is another small waterfall falling on a terrace and from that terrace the waterfall runs through a small stone arch all the way down to the bottom of the cliff.  Interestingly...
  • One of the visitors to Iceland during the settlement era, over 1100 years ago, claimed the island to be covered in lush forest. His claim has always been mind-boggling to the Icelanders who can't help but wonder what happened to their trees. Some say the wind swept them away. Others claim the "bloody" sheep gnawed them away with the farmers turning their livestock into game roaming heaths and moors and mountains all summer long. After our trees had disappeared a new plan was implemented...
  • Once upon a time in Iceland, there was a mountain full of the material spar. It was at a remote location by the Helgustaðir farm, east of Eskifjörður. It existed simply to please those who were living in the area – or traveling from Eskifjörður to Vöðlavík. Then, spar became a commodity and mining commenced. Spar is a type of calcite crystal, completely transparent and can split light into two parallel beams. It was a vital component in the early microscopes, and the Icelandic spar was...
  • The Hengifoss waterfall is one of the best-known landmarks in East Iceland. At 118 m high it is the island's third highest waterfall and certainly one of the most picturesque. Cutting through steep walls of Tertiary lava strata you will find layers of red clay pressed between the basaltic lava giving providing the cliffs with their striped façade.  From the landscape surrounding Hengifoss, you can practically read the history of geology. Fossilized conifer and other tree-trunks, as well as...
  • Klifbrekkufossar is a name for a series of small waterfalls one above the other at the bottom of the fjord Mjóifjörður in eastern Iceland. The waterfalls are a spectacular sight around 90 meters high and the best way to see them all in the same view is actually from the road and by the roadside at the bottom of the falls.  There is limited if any advantage to getting any closer or even climbing the side of the waterfalls to get a "better" view.  Fed by multiple sources of water on the heath...
  • In addition to elves, little people, trolls, ghosts and other unworldly creatures, Icelanders, of course, have a sea-monsters. Just like its neighboring Scotland has the Loch Ness monster, Iceland has the tongue-twisting Lagarfljótsormurinn. It has always been there, in Lake Lögurinn, or Lagarfljót. Even the Vikings were terrified. The monster has been a source of endless tales, verses, and rhymes across the centuries and was last sighted by a local farmer in 2012. Located in the beautiful...

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