The Eyjafjallajokull eruption put Iceland on the map for many people

  • The Eyjafjallajokull eruption put Iceland on the map for many people
  • The Eyjafjallajokull eruption put Iceland on the map for many people
  • The Eyjafjallajokull eruption put Iceland on the map for many people
May 3 2017

Seven years ago the eruption at Eyjafjallajokull volcano grabbed the attention of the world.  In recent times few eruptions have caught a similar attention.  It was almost the only thing the news media discussed for days. One of the main reasons was, of course, the concern that the volcanic ash the eruption spewed into the atmosphere would damage aircraft engines.  Consequently, most of the airspace in Europe was closed down for days and all aircraft grounded with consequence for hundreds of thousands of people.

Volcanic fire and ice is not a good mix

The Eyjafjallajokull eruption occurred under a thick ice cap like many disturbing eruptions in Iceland.  When the magma enters the surface beneath the glacier, the ice melts quickly producing an enormous amount of water and volcanic ash. It also produces small particles of glass sending it into the atmosphere. Particles that many feared could cause damage to aircraft engines.  As the magma had a thick ice cap to work with the shot down of air traffic continued for days and in some places for weeks, depending on weather and wind direction.

A thick layer of ash filled many places in Iceland

Although much of the ash produced by the eruption at Eyjafjallajokull was delivered to the Ocean south of Iceland, a large portion fell in the area around the glacier. The thick wall of ash sometimes filled the air and transformed days into nights as darkness fell on large areas. All this was extremely stressful for people and all living creatures around the volcano.

A huge event but no one got hurt

The event was huge on any scale.  Fortunately, no one got hurt, and damage was limited.  Most of the places where water and ash affected land and roads recovered in few moths. And air traffic was back to normal few weeks after the eruption stopped.  Nothing has probably put Iceland on the map for many people in the world as Eyjafjallajokull volcano did.