Reykjanes Peninsula home of many natural wonders

The Reykjanes Peninsula offers many spectacular natural wonders to visit for those who travel to Iceland.  The Reykjanes Peninsula countryside is a place one should surely drive while in Iceland. It is an ideal choice for stopover passengers or those who choose to take a brief trip to Iceland.  The Reykjanes Peninsula offers spectacular cliffs, fantastic landscape and coastline, interesting lakes, geological phenomenon, and magnificent hot springs. It is the home of the famous Blue Lagoon and is one of the places you should not miss if you visit Iceland. An ideal drive is the Reykjanes Peninsula drive if you rent a car and is comfortable day tour if you are staying in Reykjavík or in the towns near the International Airport in Iceland. It also has many great spots and places to see the Northern Lights or the Aurora Borealis on clear evenings during winter. 

  • Básendar at Reykjanes Peninsula in Iceland, once a small, prosperous hamlet, was destroyed in a matter of hours. Básendar, also referred to as Bátsendar in annals, was an old fishing and trading post. Located a short distance from the town of Sandgerði, it was one of the ports for the Danish Trade Monopoly and covered the whole southern shore of the Reykjanes Peninsula. During the 15th and 16th centuries, Básendar was a prosperous place serving English and Dutch ships. But, all that came to and...
  • In Iceland, the Blue Lagoon at the Reykjanes Peninsula is becoming a landmark equivalent to Big Ben in London and the Eiffel Tower in Paris. It is a place most visitors and tourists that plan a trip and come to Iceland want to visit.  Needless to say, it is probably the most popular tourist destination in Iceland. These unique baths were discovered accidentally in the 1970s. During a construction operation at the nearby Geothermal power plant, the workers decided to use this natural pool to...
  • For anyone slightly interested in geology the Reykjanes peninsula is like a candy store or a wonderland.  This small area is packed with samples of how the planet behaves over time, i.e. over a period of tens of thousands of years.  Here you will find volcanoes, mountains and mountain rigs, a variety of lava, hot springs, craters, boiling clays, ravines, rhyolites, fissures, geothermal activity, high-temperature geothermal system and the list goes on. A bridge where North America and Europe...
  • Reykjanes peninsula has many interesting places and several natural wonders. In fact, one could easily spend a few days in Iceland and only visit interesting places on the Reykjanes peninsula. One of those beautiful places is Lake Djúpavatn, less than an hours drive from Reykjavík. It is a bit difficult to visit since the road is a kind of a Highland gravel road for 4X4 vehicles only. But that makes visiting the place just a bit more exciting and adventures. There are also a few interesting...
  • When you visit the Reykjanes Lighthouse, allow yourself enough time to roam the area. First of all, it will be worth your while to follow a trail to reach the spectacular shoreline along the cliffs. Opposite the lighthouse, you will most certainly want to embark on the easy climb to the top of Valahnjúkur cliff. When there you can lie down on the brink to enjoy the sight of the powerful Atlantic waves breaking on the sheer cliffs. It is a dizzying experience. Eldey island the mighty rock in...
  • Just a few kilometers south of the Geothermal area Seltún at Krísuvík is a small lake, Grænavatn (Greenlake). The lake is a volcanic crater that got its name from its unusual green color. The color is due to a high level of sulphur in the water and its depth.  The lake is only about few hundred meters in diameter and offers a perfect trail for a refreshing walk, as it only takes about 20 minutes to walk around the lake.  For a small lake it is quite deep, though, or 45 meters.  This is visible...
  • In the Icelandic nature, everything has a name, every mountain, every valley, every canyon, fissure or even crack.  And almost behind each name is a story. The most southern tip of the Reykjanes Peninsula is a spectacular place to visit. A highly active geothermal area of mud pools and steam vents boiling practically under your feet – if you dare to walk the wooden planks crisscrossing the area. Indeed, here is where you find the biggest mud pool in Iceland, Gunnuhver – or Gunna hot spring....
  • Hiking is extremely popular amongst Icelanders. Quite understandably. You can practically crisscross the entire country along hiking trails. Up moors and mountains, along valleys and prairies, through lava fields and fissures. And, as much as the Icelanders love their mountains, the Reykjanes Peninsula is gradually becoming the most popular area for hiking. The Reykjanes Peninsula has excellent trails for the most experienced hikers, where you will find trails with steep climbs, trying grounds...
  • The church at Hvalsnes on the western part of the Reykjanes Peninsula is somewhat revered by the Christian Icelanders. The longest serving priest in the Hvalsnes parish was Hallgrímur Pétursson, a much-loved hymn writer whose life has become a legend. Even though he served the parish long before the present church was built, the Icelanders tend to look on the church site as a kind of a holy place. This humble, still impressive church was built from carved basaltic stones from the local area...
  • Apart from the Snæfellsjökull glacier, Mount Keilir on the Reykjanes Peninsula is possibly the most painted mountain in Iceland. This perfectly cone-shaped mountain has always fascinated artists. It is renowned for the colorful display of lights and shadows surrounding it at dawn and dusk, often bathing the mountain in a mythical light. Keilir is a palagonite mountain. It was formed during a sub-glacial eruption during the Ice age. Still, Keilir is not a stratovolcano, like the Snæfellsjökull...

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