Towns and villages at the Reykjanes Peninsula

The Reykjanes peninsula has five towns, all placed by the shore as each one is a former fishing town and at least two still are. The Reykjanes Peninsula is probably one of the places in Iceland most people visit as it is the home of the international airport and probably the place where most people pick up their rent a car or meet their tour guides. This area is in many ways different from the rest of the country. Tourism has always been a large part of the community since the International airport is located on the Reykjanes peninsula right by Keflavík (Reykjanesbær).  Together all of the towns and villages have convenient accommodations, camping sites, gas stations, convenience stores, restaurants or cafés, swimming pools and some form of recreational activity, museums, and adventure tours.  The Reykjanes Peninsula also offers spectacular sights and natural wonders and is one of the most interesting parts of Iceland with its lava, hot springs and of course the famous Blue Lagoon.

  • The church at Garður village
    Garður village by on the tip of the Reykjanes Peninsula is a wonderful place to visit if you plan to travel to Iceland.  Located right by the International airport access is easy.  On the town's website, Garður makes the claim that the area and land where the village is today is mentioned in the Icelandic book of settlements. Aparently Ingólfur Arnarson, the first settler in Iceland, gave his cousin, Steinunni gömlu, an area "south by the sea".  Similar to its neighbors and other municipals in Reykjanes Peninsula, Garður developed from a cluster of fishing farms to a fishing village beginning in the second half of the nineteenth century and into the twentieth century. The distance from...
  • Grindavík is a town in the Reykjanes peninsula in Iceland
    As a municipal, Grindavík located at Reykjanes Peninsula is one of the most interesting towns on the Icelandic coastline.  Interesting from the point of view of being a typical Icelandic fishing town and it is one of few towns in Iceland which survived the fishing quota system, created by the Icelandic government in 1990. A quota system that hit many fishing towns hard.   In recent decades, the fishing industry in Grindavík has grown and thrived in sharp contrast to most former fishing towns along the coastline.  One of the most active fishing towns in Iceland Grindavík has many large and small fishing vessels and is one of the most important fishing harbors in Iceland.  The harbor is one...
  • Reykjanesbær is the center town in the Reykjanes Peninsula in Iceland
    Reykjanesbær or Keflavík town is the main home town of the International Airport in Iceland and is also part of the Reykjanes Peninsula drive.  Originally, Keflavik was a typical fishing farm and a fishing town from early on throughout the first half of the twentieth century.  The town had a small harbor and a fish processing plant that was the livelihood of the residents. During World War II, the United States Army built a naval base for Iceland’s defense and to secure the northern Atlantic route.   The Army also built an airfield, which later became Iceland’s international airport. The military base was in operation until September 2006.  During that time, thousands of U.S. soldiers lived...
  • The oldes house in Sandgerði town in Iceland
    Like, many small towns and villages by the coastline in Iceland, Sandgerði owes its existences to rich fishing grounds just off the coast.  Most of those towns are fairly new, in a historical sense, and rarely trace their history farther back than to the late nineteenth century.  Up until that time, Iceland was mostly an agricultural society, and towns like Sandgerði consisted of a cluster of fishing farms that formed a fishing post by the seaside. Sandgerði started its fishing venture with motorboats Sandgerði began to develop as a fishing village in the second half of the nineteenth century when motorboats took over the rowing boats.  At that time, a new breed of Icelandic entrepreneurs...
  • Street view at Vogar is a village.
    Although Iceland was an agricultural society throughout history, some areas around the coastline were fishing communities that consisted of fishing farms and fishing posts. This reason was mostly due to a short distance to large and generous fishing grounds and lack of fertile land.  Some of these clusters of fishing farms also had trading posts where they traded stockfish for commodities.   The town of Vogar on the Reykjanes peninsula located between Reykjavík and the International airport in Keflavík is such a place. A fishing village  Even though the town's land area is quite large, it doesn’t have many economic advantages in an agricultural sense since the land consists mostly of lava...