Reykjanes Peninsula home of many natural wonders

The Reykjanes Peninsula offers many spectacular natural wonders to visit for those who travel to Iceland.  The Reykjanes Peninsula countryside is a place one should surely visit while in Iceland. It is an ideal choice for stopover passengers or those who choose to take a brief trip to Iceland.  The Reykjanes Peninsula offers spectacular cliffs, fantastic landscape and coastline, interesting lakes, geological phenomenon, and magnificent hot springs. It is the home of the famous Blue Lagoon and is one of the places you should not miss if you visit Iceland. An ideal drive is the Reykjanes Peninsula drive if you rent a car and is comfortable day tour with Hit Iceland if you are staying in Reykjavík or in the towns near the International Airport in Iceland. It also has many great spots and places to see the Northern Lights or the Aurora Borealis on clear evenings during winter. 

  •   On the road to Krýsuvík, you will pass the beautiful geothermal area at Seltún. The main area is a fascinating hot spring field to the southwest, recognizable by the mud pools and steaming ground. Through the steam, you'll notice the yellow, green and red-orange colors, as well as the white and brown colors of the sulfates. The sulfates dissolve in water and become mottled. Thus, when it rains they disappear altogether, leaving only the bright yellow, green and red colors of the sulfur. It is...
  •   Selatangar is an old fishing stations and one of the few around the coast of Iceland that is remaining, although only as ruins.  Throughout the centuries, from the early 14th century and up until the late 19th century, fishing stations were essential for most farms and families in Iceland in their effort to sustain. For many farms, it was part of their livelihood. Even though Iceland was an agricultural society, many families and farms needed to add fish to their meals to sustain because the...
  •   The Reykjanes Lighthouse is Iceland's oldest lighthouse.  It was built during 1907 and 1908 instead of the old lighthouse that had been built in 1878 but was destroyed by an earthquake eight years later. At the time, it was the most advanced and expensive structure to be built in Iceland. The current Reykjanes Lighthouse was designed by the Danish architect Frederik Kjorbo and the Danish engineer Thorvald Krabbe.  It is a 26.7-meter high concrete construction with traditional looks. The...
  •   The mountain Trölladyngja (Troll Mountain) is quite curious. This dwarf of a mountain (only 275 meters high) consists of palagonite like most mountains in the area. Trölladyngja and its surroundings is part of the Krísuvík Geothermal Area, but only recently so. Until 1975, there was no geothermal activity around the mountain, but a few years later things started to shift and change. Today Trölladyngja is geothermally very active. It is quite apparent in the colorful south side of the mountain...
  •   Vigdísarvellir has always been a popular camping site in Iceland, especially amongst the people living on the Reykjanes Peninsula. It used to be a smallholding from the Þórkötlustaðir farm in Grindavík inhabited until 1900. Explaining why Vigdísarvellir is the only spot in the Peninsula's lava fields where you'll find large green pastures. Also, you will still find the ruins of the old crofts in situ. Vigdísarvellir, along with Lake Djúpavatn, is part of the high-temperature geothermal area...

Pages