West Region

  • Arnarstapi on the south coast of the Snæfellsnes Peninsula is one of Iceland's favorite destinations. It is a mesa surrounded by exquisite nature, great history and has the best access to the Snæfellsjökull glacier. This tiny village wasn't always this small. During the fifteen and sixteen centuries, it was an important trading post and an important fishing village. Today, the Arnarstapi dock is and important harbor for small boats and also a popular destination for pleasure crafts and yachts...
  • At the mention of Barnafossar, or the Children's Falls, Icelanders usually turn quiet. For centuries, the beautiful falls have been overshadowed by a tragedy that goes on dwelling on the Icelandic consciousness. The Falls derive their name from a folklore: The folklore that gave the waterfall its name Once, there lived a widow at the Hraunás farm. She was quite well of and independent. Come Christmas and, of course, all the grown-ups were expected to attend evensong at the nearby church at...
  • Bárðarlaug is a small lake near the road 574, the ring road that goes around the glacier Snæfellsjökull. When you take the turn to Hellnar, the lake is on your right and a parking spot ten minutes walk from the lake.  The part of the name "laug" in this context means bath.  So the name is really the bath of Bárður Snæfellsás, referring to the mystical person that has hovered over the area around Snæfellsjokull as well as the glacier for centuries.  A bath for Bárður approximately eleven...
  • The huge statue of Bárður Snæfellsás that is so noticeable when you drive into the small village or hamlet Arnarstapi was made by Ragnar Kjartansson one of Iceland most renowned sculptures.  The statue is his interpretation of the giant character that dominates the area around Snæfellsjökull glacier. Bárður the half man half troll Bárður is an extraordinary being from the time of settlement in Iceland.  His story was written in Medieval times in the fifteenth century and is part of the...
  • Some mountains in Iceland are more impressive than others. It doesn't have to do with size or magnitude. It has more to do with its role and identity. Baula in Borgarfjörður is one of those mountains. Like Keilir on the Reykjanes Peninsula Baula is known to most Icelanders. At the mere mention of those two mountains, everyone can instantly visualize them, as well as their surroundings.  Like Keilir, Baula is cone-shaped and have forever served as landmarks for travellers. When you pass Baula,...
  •   Eyrbyggja Saga tells us about two Swedish Berserks, Halli and Leiknir, who Vermundur the Slim, a farmer at Bjarnarhofn, brought to Iceland from Norway in 982. Vermundur meant to use them to stand up to his powerful brother Styr the Slayer. Of course, this wimp didn't have what it took to deal with the enormity of the Berserks' temper. Soon after arriving in Iceland he had to ask his brother to take them off his hands. Styr the Slayer reluctantly obliged but soon faced some problems. The...
  • The Snaefellsnes Peninsula is one of the most Saga invested parts of Iceland. Every part and every place have a reference to one of the major Sagas; the most prominent being Eyrbyggja or the Saga of the People of Eyri and Laxdæla. Sagas and stories that were written six to nine hundred years ago about the settlement and medieval times in Iceland. The lava field Berserkjahraun On this Peninsula, you will find the impressive and beautiful Berserkjahraun, or the Berserk Lava Field. The lava is...
  • Bjarnarfoss waterfall is an impressive waterfall right by road 54 on the Snæfellsnes Peninsula.  The location is where the main road splits to Fróðaárheiði leading to Ólafsvík in the northern part and to Búðir and Arnarstapi on the south shore of the peninsula. Although the waterfall can be seen from the main road, the most enjoyable and interesting part of the waterfall is quite high in the cliffs and takes an effort to walk up the steep slope by the stream coming from the waterfall.  A...
  • Djúpalónssandur or Deeplagoonsand is a fascinating place for many reasons. The name is traced back to some of the first settlers in Iceland some twelve hundred years ago.  It was the landing place of Bárður Snæfellsás and his family and crew.  It is also a place where farmers and people at Snæfellsne Peninsula used as a fishing station for centuries.  And last but not least it is a beautiful place with stunning landforms. The pebble beach, small lakes, and stunning lava formation When you...
  •   If you feel the need for dramatics while traveling in Iceland, Dritvík on the Snæfellsnes Peninsula is the place to go. A place with beautiful landscape and rich history.  Today it is difficult to imagine that Dritvík was one of the largest fishing station in Iceland for centuries with up to 60 fishing boats, dozens of huts and full of life. From the middle of the 16th century up to 400 inhabitants lived here during the fishing season and this continued until the early 20th century. At that...

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