#rockformation

This amazing rock formation is said to have formed during Ice Age, when sea level was higher and its waves formed the facade of the rocks. These columnar basalt forms are called Dverghamrar or The Dwarf Cliffs. It is a perfect pitstop when travelling in the southern region of Iceland, situated only 10 km east of the Kirkjubæjarklaustur village. This might be one of the most grand homes of dwarfs and elves in Iceland so naturally the cliffs are treated respectfully, since no one wants to risk disturbing these mystical creatures with a history of cruel revenges.

These columnar basalt forms are called Dverghamrar or The Dwarf Cliffs

Hvítserkur or white shirt as it is translated to English is 15 m high basalt rock situated near the eastern shore of Vatnsnes. It is home to many sea bird species and most likely its name derives from the white guano deposited on the rock. Before arriving to Hvítserkur there is a nice café to grab a coffee, from there you can either walk the rest in 30 minutes or drive up towards the view point. We definitely recommend a stop by Hvítserkur if driving in the north of Iceland. It is even more special to see, when the sea is still, allowing the rock formation to mirror completely.

Hvítserkur or white shirt as it is translated to English is 15 m high basalt rock situated near the eastern shore of Vatnsnes.

 

Fjaðrárgljúfur int the south region in Iceland is a 100 m deep and 2 km long spectacular canyon close to Kirkjubæjarklaustur. With steep palagonite walls, the river Fjaðrá snakes its way along the canyon from Geirlandshraun Mountain to the large Skaftá River.  The bedrock is mostly palagonite from the "cold" period of the Ice Age some two million years ago. Ever since the river has pottered about carving this beautiful canyon for everyone to admire.  The water level of the river is rather a low in current times and fed by a spring fed river.

A wonder world from above as well as from the river banks

Due to the water level, hikers can safely walk inside the canyon although having to do some wading now and then. It is a highly adventures hike, and the deeper into the canyon you walk, the more exotic it becomes. The deepest part of the canyon is truly a wonder world of water, cliffs, vegetation and adventures forms.  Most visitors prefer to walk along the hiking trail along the edge of the canyon to get the best of both worlds; being able to observe the fantastic rock formations in the canyon itself while enjoying the view mountain view from the top.  To spend a bit of time and do both is the best option and the most rewarding.

A natural wonder discovered by tourists

Although Fjaðrárgljúfur is only a short distance from the Ring Road Nr 1 in Iceland, it has never been particularly popular among Icelanders.  Most of the Icelanders traveling the Ring Road before the tourist explosion began skipped this magnificent natural wonder when driving the Ring Road.  It is one of the places tourists and visitors discovered and showed much more interest in than Icelanders ever did. When traveling the ring road in a rent a car or your vehicle you take a turn on the Ring Road Nr. 1 near Kirkjubæjarklaustur north to Road Nr. 206 and you only need to drive approximately 3 kilometers to reach the parking lot at Fjaðrárgljúfur.

WHAT KIND OF CAR FITS FOR AN ICELAND ROAD TRIP?
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Below is the location of Fjaðrárgljúfur on the map of Iceland

Fjaðrárgljúfur, a 100 m deep and 2 km long canyon close to Kirkjubæjarklaustur.

 

Dyrhólaey is a naturally formed arch on the shoreline west of the tiny village of Vík on the south coast in Iceland. It is one of the main attractions on the South Shore Tours and one of the most impressive stops when driving the Ring Road in Iceland. The 120 m high basalt rock is a former volcanic island, formed in an eruption some one hundred thousand years ago. The raging Atlantic Ocean has shaped the cliffs since the Ice Age. The hole in the middle was carved out by the ocean digging out the weaker remaining rocks over a long period.  In addition to the arch, interesting stacks are standing tall just south of the Dyrhólaey cliffs.  All have names like Kvistdrangur, Mávadrangur, Kambur, and Háidrangur (56 meters high).  When you look at Háidrangur, you can picture when it was first climed in 1893 by a famous daredevil named Eldeyjar-Hjalti. His task was to put nails into the cliff to make it easier for others to climb and collect eggs.

Dyrhólaey island and arch

Observe the huge and aggressive ocean waves of the Atlantic Ocean

A rare natural wonder it is

The whole formation, the island, the black beach and rocky shoreline around the island, the stacks and the arch is a spectacular natural phenomenon.  Officially there are two ways to view Dyrhólaey: From the top by the parking area by the old lighthouse that was built in 1910 and renovated in 1927, and on the east side of the arch by the new service center and parking lot. Both offer great views, and if you have taken the time to visit Dyrhólaey you should stop by both of them.  From the lower level, you also have an excellent view to the famous Reynisfjara black beach east of Dyrhólaey.

Dyrhólaey is a nature reserve

Consequently, in addition to being a great natural wonder, Dyrhólaey is a beautiful location for birdwatching. Needless to say, there are of course infinitive photo opportunities by Dyrhólaey.  Not only from the top but also from both viewing panels.   In 1978 Dyrhólaey became a nature reserve as nature and birdlife during spring, and early summer is quite sensitive and requires monitoring. Keep in mind that the Dyrhólaey area is sometimes closed in May and early June. During late summer, autumn and winter the site is a spectacular place to observe the huge and aggressive ocean waves of the Atlantic Ocean.  The waves that are continually molding the south coast of Iceland.  But during storms and high tides, extreme caution is needed.

A view to the Reynisfjara beach

A view to the Reynisfjara beach

Caution is needed if you choose to walk the black beach

Some years ago, the black beach surrounding Dyrhólaey was accessible by walking down to Kirkjufjara beach by the lower parking lot.  Although a marvelous place when the tide is low, and winds are still it is a hazardous place in different situations, and even life-threatening.  After some horrifying accidents, the beach was closed, and access is not allowed. We can only emphasize that you should stay on marked trails and keep in mind that the waves are extremely dangerous and unpredictable.

Dyrhólaey is easily accessible from the Ring Road.

When you are driving on Suðurlandsvegur or the southern part of the Ring Road, you take a turn to the south on the road Dyrhólavegur nr. 218.  The drive to the top of the Dyrhólaey island by the Lighthouse is approximately six kilometers.  And between the parking lots, you only drive about 500 meters. 

WHAT KIND OF CAR FITS FOR AN ICELAND ROAD TRIP?
Read this important article before you choose a car.

Below is the location of Dyrhólaey on the map of Iceland

Dyrholaey is one of the southern most part of Iceland