Towns and villages

There are 63 towns and villages in Iceland in the seven Regions, most of them on the coastline.  For anyone traveling in Iceland, they form an essential infrastructure.  Almost in each town or small village, you will find excellent accommodation, a convenience store, gas station, a camp site with outstanding facilities, a swimming pool, and a restaurant often offering delicious fishing soup and Icelandic specialties. In many towns and villages, you will also find interesting museums, hiking tracks, and adventure tours provided by local people.  The longest distance between two towns and villages on the Ring Road never exceeds 200 kilometers, so anyone on a tour in Iceland doesn't need to worry about service.  The towns and villages in Iceland make travel around the whole country comfortable and enjoyable.   

  • Street view at Vogar is a village.
    Although Iceland was an agricultural society throughout history, some areas around the coastline were fishing communities that consisted of fishing farms and fishing posts. This reason was mostly due to a short distance to large and generous fishing grounds and lack of fertile land.  Some of these clusters of fishing farms also had trading posts where they traded stockfish for commodities.   The town of Vogar on the Reykjanes peninsula located between Reykjavík and the International airport in Keflavík is such a place. A fishing village  Even though the town's land area is quite large, it doesn’t have many economic advantages in an agricultural sense since the land consists mostly of lava...
  • Vopnafjörður is a small village in the Eastern Region in Iceland
    The small village of Vopnafjörður is in the Eastern region and like its neighbours was quite isolated and remote for centuries.  Mostly due to the distance from other more populated areas and poor communication. The name Vopnafjörður means the fjord of weapons and comes from the first settler Eyvindur Weapon, a Viking that settled here in the 9th century.  One of the Icelandic Sagas bears the name of the area, Vopnfirðingasaga. So the small village has a profound historical reference. A trading place Danish-Icelandic Monopoly In the 17th and 18th century the fjord was a place of trading and merchants came here from Europe.  It was one of three principal places of trading in the North East...
  • Þingeyri is a small village in the West Fjords in Iceland
    Þingeyri is a small village, located on the southern side of the fjord Dýrafjörður or Animal Fjord. It is one of the few small towns or villages in The West Fjords that doesn’t have a high, almost threatening mountain right above the village. On the contrary, the area around the village is wide, compared to many other communities. Although the village was an old trading place for the trading companies that had permission from the Danish–Icelandic Trade Monopoly, it didn’t start to develop as a community until the late nineteenth century. One of the oldest buildings in Iceland is at Þingeyri, an old warehouse built in 1734.  But it wasn’t until a few farmers purchased a docked vessel in the...
  • Þorlákshöfn is a tiny village in the Southern Region in Iceland
    For visitors, Þorlákshöfn is a good place to stop.  The village offers most of the necessary facilities and service visitors look for when finding an overnight place to stay or a place to rest.  Þorlákshöfn has a great swimming pool, a good camp site, a convenient store and excellent accommodations.  It is a young village with a short history. Throughout history, the question of a good harbour for the long south shore in Iceland has always been pressing. Although merchant vessels in the 16th up to the 19th-century didn't need a dock as they anchored near the coast in the nearby village Eyrarbakki, they needed some protection from the unpredictable forces of the Atlantic Ocean. And fishing...
  • Þórshöfn is a small village in the Northern Region in Iceland
    Þórshöfn is a small village in the Northeast region in Iceland, remote and far away from most places. Although Þórshöfn was never a large village, it reached its peak in the seventies, when around 500 people lived in the village. Since then, there has been a decline in the population and today less than 400 people live in the village. Historically Þórshöfn is a village that developed from trading, not fishing and fish processing like most villages around the coast in Iceland. On the other hand, the main economic base and livelihood of the residents today is more or less related to the fish industry. Þórshöfns origin can be traced to trading Trading by German merchants was documented as...

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